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FREE STORIES

A bean is revealed when you open it's shell - Zulu proverb.

We live in such a wonderful country. (My opening line on so many of my stories!) We have had an incredible past and that strange history has been used by many of us as a catalyst for personal change and growth. And sadly others still hark after the past, or operate as if nothing has changed!

And change it has! South Africa has gone from skunk nation status to a place of beauty and wonder. A place where all people can live their lives with self-respect and respect for others. Our marvellous land is viewed as one of the top 18 investment paradises in the world.

I can remember when it was difficult to move around the world with a South African passport. When people in love could not be married - by virtue of their colour or race. Where we were separated into groups, denied or benefited by virtue of our birth. When cars were driven across the beautiful highways of our nation at 70kms an hour because of fuel sanctions. (A trip from Johannesburg to the coast took up to 12 hours in holiday season!)

It was a time when we were so divided that we did not know how others lived. And we did not know or understand the realities of life for people who were not white.

I am delighted that Apartheid has all passed behind us. I am excited to be a part of this new country where we are an example to the world. I am happy to be a pioneer laying the groundwork through affirmative action and employment equity for the children of the new generations. Sometimes it is hard to be white and male in South Africa. But nowhere as hard as it was to be "non-white in Apartheid South Africa! Yes, we are the voortrekkers, we are the star fleet boldly opening up new frontiers and horizons. And we are opening up our country to all of it's peoples. What a legacy to build for future generations!

Arthie and I are delightfully and ecstatically married. In the old South Africa this would have been impossible! We would have been hunted down and exposed. Here is a piece sourced from http://www.fact-index.com/i/im/immorality_act.html that shows just how far we have come.
"The Immorality Act was one of the most controversial legislative acts of South African Apartheid. It attempted to forbid intermixing of couples of different race both in the area of marriage as well as casual sex.
Mixed marriages and the immorality act became the first major pieces of apartheid legislation. In 1949 mixed marriages were banned in South Africa. In 1950 the act was followed up with a ban on sexual relations between blacks and whites. One of the first people convicted of the immorality act was a Cape Dutch Reformed minister; he was caught having sex with a domestic worker in his garage. He was given a suspended sentence and the parishioners bulldozed the garage to the ground.
On the grounds of the Immorality Act, the police tracked down mixed couples suspected of being in relationships. Homes were invaded and doors were smashed down in the process. Mixed couples caught in bed were arrested. Underwear was used as forensic evidence in court. Most couples found guilty were sent to jail. Blacks were often given harsher sentences than whites.
In 1985 the Immorality Act and Prohibition of Mixed Marriages Act were both repealed."

The full extent of forgiveness in our country from 1990 until now will never be quantified. It has been hugely miraculous that we are where we are now.

Imagine my surprise when attending a birthday party for a 3 year old, when the other young parents banded into a group. And allowed a few of their group to make loud comments on Arthie and my relationship. "These mixed marriages are not on," said one. After a few more similar comments another stated. "At least the child came out o.k." Referring to our son Lliam who has a light Italian complexion.

Arthie has always maintained that we are indeed a mixed couple. "One boy and one girl. That is a good mix!", she says. And of course any couple comes from mixed backgrounds. They were raised differently by their respective parents, with different morals, in different homes and in different circumstances. And some times even when your complexion is similar it is hard to mix. Have you ever heard the one about "My mother-in-law...?"

Back to the kiddies party. We did not feel aggrieved. And we felt no hurt from the "injustice" of their words, we only felt the pain in their souls. These poor and misguided people were still living in a mind-view set by a law repealed nearly 20 years ago. Some of them may only have been 5 or 6 years old at that time! I wondered what their parents had told them and how they now programme their own children.

Yes, we wish that one day they will find love and peace. And that they too can be human beings first and not live in judgement of the first thing that their eyes see.

Which leads me to a Zulu proverb. "Uhlubu' dlube 'khasini" Literally - "A bean is revealed when you open the shell." It is used when one is surprised by the wisdom, skills or talents of another, or when a person does something amazing that you do not expect. This is similar to the English proverb, "you can't judge a book by its cover."

Somehow we were being judged by our 'colours" and a muddled perception of a "perfect relationship". Just as others are daily judged, by people from all backgrounds, by their religion, race, language, favourite sport or soccer side, hair colour, heritage and education. And anything else that makes them different to the judges.

Arthie and I have the most beautiful relationship. With our marvellous uniquenesses we add to each other. We grow each other and complement each other. We are soul-mates. Ours is a match made in Heaven! Our multi-lingual 3 year old son Llliam is a stunning, loving, warm and intelligent child.

So before you judge us - take time to get past the shell. We may be three very beautiful beans! When our true selves are revealed you may find something special within. The multi-diverse people of South Africa are all incredibly unique beans in diverse shells. They are the reasons that we have such a marvellous country. They are what makes this such an exciting place to live in!

My greatest understanding is that people, who are different to you and I, add to us. They bring wonderful knowledge, wisdom, traditions and cultures. They bring new ideas and new views. And they only add to us when we open the shell, question, experience and delight in their uniqueness.

Let us step away from our simplistic programmed assessments and move into today. Right here, right now, with the human beans (beings) who make you and I human. As Arthie and I have discovered, there is so much freedom in being human first and anything else much later.

Brian V Moore - Mthimkhulu International©
24 May 2004

....feedback from our readers

You are a nice person Brian, keep doing what you do - the good people always win in the end. I hope that I am able to meet you when I come to South Africa this year. I have found that both my children are the most fantastic beans , under their shells .

PB - England

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Dumelang! Thank you for "opening the bean" to me. Your opening it to me brings a lot of memories and it is good that you remind us, lest we forget. Once again, thank you. I really appreciated that piece. Khotso ebe le lona.

MM - Pretoria, South Africa

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How true this is - as a child I had an Indian friend that lived on a small holding close by, we used to have such great fun until one day she told me they had to move. I did not understand and cried about losing my one and only friend. My parents were very upset with me because she was "beneath" my "status" and not worthy of all my tears and I had to find a friend of the same colour and all the rest of their racist remarks, but my heart was broken and as a 5 year old did not understand how the colour of her skin could make her move to the other side of town and never to be seen again!
Years later my mother nearly killed me when I said to her that, if I were born with a black skin in this country, I would have been the first on Robbin Island, and most probably would have landed up being the President of this country!
When I had children of my own we used to send them to my parents for school holiday, and what a battle when they came back! I did not dare take them to town with me because of all the racist remarks they made! I spoke to my parents about it, told them our beliefs and had a huge family fight - they went so far as to call us "K-boeties" Said we were not fit to parent our children or to be good "white" citizens! All this of course before the wonderful changes but we were regarded to be "outcasts"! Today my children can mix with other races without any problems because we raised them with the belief that all are equal and that the colour of one's skin does not make him superior or give him certain rights! My poor parents will - I suppose - die with the belief that they were "sold out" and I really pity them!
Best wishes, and keep up the wonderful e-mails!

IW - Sasolburg, South Africa

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Celebrating Humanity

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